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Thunder lizard by Durbed Thunder lizard by Durbed
Probably a more fitting name for what is currently known as Apatosaurus louisae, or at least more evocative. (Technically it was A. excelsus the one that used to be Brontosaurus, but A. louisae seems to deserve it more, imo.)

Brontosaurus/Apatosaurus was probably my favourite sauropod as a kid. I always loved how brutish and robust it looked next to his more popular buddy Diplodocus. I actually have the impression that both dinosaurs (including D. hallorum AKA ex-Seismosaurus) have become less and less popular as new and apparently more interesting sauropod species were unearthed. They're not the longest or the heaviest sauropods ever known anymore, so they're not trendy. But I digress.

I drew it with the spikes oftenly associated with diplodocids, but arranged very differently to what is commonly depicted. Some evidence seem to suggest that there wasn't such a thing as single row of spikes running down the midline of the diplodocid, but they were probably more loosely distributed all along the body, providing a defense similar to those of some ankylosaurs - although the amount of surface they covered is still unknown. This makes sense to me, since this animals would need all the defense they needed until they reached full size and became nearly invulnerable,and their environment (Morrison formation) wasn't exactly hervibore friendly.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2013
Apparently, the Apatosaurus is able to grow very large, larger than Supersaurus

[link]

[link]
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:icongilarah93:
Gilarah93 Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Fantastic restoration, you've done the "Bulldozer of the Jurassic" great justice :D

That new theory on the bodily spines is quite interesting - do you happen to have any further sources for that?
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012
I think Scott Hartman mentioned it somewhere here in DA, and actually don't remember how most of the explanation was (but I tend to trust a palaeontologist word as long there isn't anything contradicting it but fan paleoart). In a nutshell, seems like the quantity and distribution of spikes around such diplodocid specimen makes the famous single row arrangement the most unlikely option. Maybe tet. zoology had a post about that too? I would have to dig a bit...
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:icongilarah93:
Gilarah93 Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Sounds plausible enough, though until a specimen is found with the spikes preserved in their true arrangement, it'll probably remain up to debate. I like the idea well enough, so I'm going to incorporate it into a few fictional sauropods of mine.

I also follow the Tet Zoo blog (just there yesterday, in fact), and I haven't seen anything about it.
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
A sauropod looking meaty yet non-obese (as far as Apatosaurus goes). Awesome work again, man!
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012
Why thank you!.. and that's what I love about Apatosaurus; despite its sturdy build and big bones it is every inch as elegant and graceful as any other diplodocid.
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:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist
Antes uno apenas si conocía a la dupla de Apatosaurus y Diplodocus, más Brachiosaurus y de pronto Saltasaurus. Pero ahora con tanto saurópodo nuevo y exótico claro que admirarlos ya no es lo mismo, pero eso no les quita que sean clásicos, y que puedan revisarse una y otra vez, como haces aquí :)
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012
Ya ves, es que hoy en dia están casi marginados...ya ni siquiera la envergadura de D. hallorum impresiona a nadie. :( Los macronarios son los estrellas del momento. Lo cual tampoco me parece mal, pero uno a veces se deja llevar por la nostalgia . ;)
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:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012  Hobbyist
Muy de acuerdo, y es que además las investigaciones de titanosaurios se están tomando este siglo, después de llevar el anterior de manera marginal...
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Student General Artist
"providing a defense similar to those of some ankylosaurs" I'm not so sure about that. They don't seem to be particularly defensive in structure.

Anyway, I like how it came out.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012
Yes, probably not nearly as effective... but I can imagine being a bit useful in juveniles or even subadults, whose backs were more exposed against middle size or small predators. Or most likely just for threatening display. Not to mention how painful one of those spiky tail blows could have been...
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
All very good "points" I'd say.
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Lovely work :).

I see what you mean, with both the "not trendy" part and the distribution of the spikes.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012
Thanks ! :)
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Welcome :aww:.
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